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Formoterol nebulizer solution

What is this medicine?

FORMOTEROL (for MOH te rol) is a long-acting bronchodilator. It treats COPD. It is always used with another medicine for COPD. Do not use this drug to treat an acute COPD attack or bronchospasm.

How should I use this medicine?

This medicine is used in a nebulizer. Nebulizers make a liquid into an aerosol that you breathe in through your mouth or your mouth and nose into your lungs. You will be taught how to use your nebulizer. Follow the directions on your prescription label. Take your medicine at regular intervals. Do not use more often than directed.

Talk to your pediatrician regarding the use of this medicine in children. Special care may be needed.

What side effects may I notice from receiving this medicine?

Side effects that you should report to your doctor or health care professional as soon as possible:

  • allergic reactions (skin rash, itching or hives; swelling of the face, lips, or tongue)

  • chest pain

  • feeling faint or lightheaded, falls

  • fever

  • heartbeat rhythm changes (trouble breathing; chest pain; dizziness; fast, irregular heartbeat; feeling faint or lightheaded, falls)

  • trouble breathing

  • unusually weak or tired

Side effects that usually do not require medical attention (report to your doctor or health care professional if they continue or are bothersome):

  • diarrhea

  • dry mouth

  • headache

  • nausea

  • sore throat

  • stuffy nose

  • tremors

  • trouble sleeping

  • vomiting

What may interact with this medicine?

Do not take this medicine with any of the following medications:

  • MAOIs like Carbex, Eldepryl, Marplan, Nardil, and Parnate

This medicine may also interact with the following medications:

  • caffeine

  • cisapride

  • diuretics

  • furazolidone

  • medicines for blood pressure

  • medicines for depression, anxiety, or psychotic disturbances

  • other medicines for breathing problems

  • pimozide

  • procarbazine

  • risperidone

  • sertindole

  • some antibiotics like clarithromycin, erythromycin, levofloxacin, and linezolid

  • some heart medicines

  • steroid medicines like prednisone or cortisone

  • stimulant medicines for attention disorders, weight loss, or to stay awake

What if I miss a dose?

If you miss a dose, take it as soon as you can. If it is almost time for your next dose, take only that dose. Do not take double or extra doses.

Where should I keep my medicine?

Keep out of the reach of children.

Store in the refrigerator between 2 and 8 degrees C (36 and 46 degrees F). Do not freeze. Protect from light and heat. Keep this medicine in the foil pouch until ready to use. Throw away any unused medicine after the expiration date.

You may also store at room temperature between 20 to 25 degrees C (68 to 77 degrees F) for up to 3 months (90 days). If stored at room temperature, throw away any unused medicine after 3 months or after the expiration date, whichever is sooner.

What should I tell my health care provider before I take this medicine?

They need to know if you have any of these conditions:

  • diabetes (high blood sugar)

  • heart disease

  • high blood pressure

  • irregular heartbeat or rhythm

  • pheochromocytoma

  • seizures

  • thyroid disease

  • an unusual or allergic reaction to formoterol, other medicines, food, dyes, or preservatives

  • pregnant or trying to get pregnant

  • breast-feeding

What should I watch for while using this medicine?

Visit your health care provider for regular checks on your progress. Tell your health care provider if your symptoms do not start to get better or if they get worse.

NEVER use this medicine for an acute asthma attack. You should use your short-acting rescue inhaler for an acute attack. If your symptoms get worse or if you need your short-acting inhalers more often, call your health care provider right away.

This medicine can worsen breathing or cause wheezing right after you use it. Be sure you have a short-acting inhaler for acute attacks (wheezing) nearby. If this happens, stop using this medicine right away and call your health care provider.

This medicine may increase your risk of dying from asthma-related problems. Talk to your health care provider if you have questions.

Do not treat yourself for coughs, colds or allergies without asking your health care provider for advice. Some nonprescription medicines can affect this one.

You and your health care provider should develop an Asthma Action Plan that is just for you. Be sure to know what to do if you are in the yellow (asthma is getting worse) or red (medical alert) zones.

If you are going to need surgery or other procedure, tell your health care provider that you are using this medicine.

NOTE:This sheet is a summary. It may not cover all possible information. If you have questions about this medicine, talk to your doctor, pharmacist, or health care provider. Copyright© 2021 Elsevier
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